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(MP3) from Album "Heresy and the Hotel Choir"
Guns of Navarone

(MP3) from Album "Heresy and the Hotel Choir"
For Science Fiction

(MP3) from Album "We, The Vehicles"
Calm

(MP3) from Album "We, The Vehicles"
Parade of Punk Rock T-Shirts

Band
PO Box 70623
Milwaukee, WI 53207
info [at] maritimesongs.com
www.maritimesongs.com

US Booking
Tim Edwards
Flowerbooking
tim [at] flowerbooking.com
www.flowerbooking.com

Riot Act Media
Dave Lewis
773.489.0851
david [at] riotactmedia.com
www.riotactmedia.com

US Radio
Ryan Rafferty
773.489.1107
radio [at] flameshovel.com

European Booking
Philipp Styra
DEAG Concerts
p.styra [at] deag.de

Japan Booking
Kota
Bad New Record
caughta [at] badnews.co.jp

There’s this song by Ned’s Atomic Dustbin (remember them?) whose title I always liked: “The Old New Un.” I always figured that it meant they’d taken an old idea and made something fresh from it; then again, maybe it’s about fish and chips. Anyway, I heard that song not long ago, and it made me think about Maritime. Dan Didier, who plays the drums, said something to me—and he said it sincerely, not giving me some marketing spiel—about how Heresy and the Hotel Choir, his band’s third album, really feels like their first.

Why is that, you ask? There’s a reason, and it doesn’t discount the contemplative, mellow chewiness of 2004’s Glass Floor or the comparatively brash rockingess of 2006’s We, The Vehicles. It’s just to say that those records (and subsequent tours) were inspired by the energy of flux, and this one is about solidity. Glass Floor took tentative steps away from Didier and singer-guitarist Davey von Bohlen’s old band, the damn-near-legendary Promise Ring (remember them?), adding former Dismemberment Plan bassist Eric Axelson to the mix. Slow chaos followed: Somewhere in there, Axelson left; other people came and went, all amicably. A string of superstar guitarists did some Maritime business: Mike Kinsella (Joan of Arc, Owen), Matt Clark (Pinebender, Bella Lea), Mike Feurstack (Wooden Stars, Snailhouse), Slash (GnR, I’m lying). For a while, the current drummer of The Arcade Fire, Jeremy Gara, played keyboards. (I’m not making that up.) Naturally, amid all the personnel hoo-ha, energies changed.

But here’s why you’re looking at something through fresh eyes, and why Maritime is, too: Things settled, as things do. Justin Klug took the four-string slot, and longtime contributor Dan Hinz—he played guitar on Vehicles—became full-fledged member Dan Hinz. (He is known to his bandmates and the Japanese as “Chicken Dan.”) And the band started writing songs like bands should—in a room together, rocking like the young people they still are. When these four got done writing songs, they didn’t need to recruit people or scramble to get a lineup together. They just went out and played them, together, and shot them full of life.

THEN, as is the proper etiquette for these things, they started recording them, enlisting the help of producer Stuart Sikes, who’s worked with lots of bands that don’t sound like Maritime, including Cat Power and Modest Mouse. (He also produced “The Rat” by The Walkmen, whose intro you’ll find was inadvertently borrowed for Heresy’s “Hand Over Hannover.” Sorry, dudes. Busted.) Anyway, that shit’s not exciting. Here’s what is, and I’m thinking about taking my shirt off for emphasis: These Songs. That’s right, capital letters. The songs on Heresy and the Hotel Choir are among the best any of these fellas have written in any of their bands, and they’re so unabashedly crackling with energy that if you’re not jiggling in your seat a little bit right now, you might very well have some kind of disease that makes you sit still. “Hours That You Keep”—frantic. “Be Unhappy”—mature, but not in that gross way. “For Science Fiction”—expansive in a way they’ve never been. “Pearl”—huge. Seriously, fire up your popguns and join the choir. Robe not necessary, but Maritime won’t turn you away if you wanna wear one. They’re just that swell

--Josh Modell, professional journalist, 2 July 07


Pitchfork
"...this one's all about the chorus, coming on so strong it takes a few listens to find out how sweet it is, with reaching, swooning vocals that cement von Bohlen as the star here. If the third album is as sharp as this, then we can finally stop endorsing his singing as 'not whiny.'"
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Spin
"Maritime makes you wish your life were a Zach Braff movie, just so you could put their songs on the soundtrack. Their sweet, poppy earworms belie their rabunctious live show, where Dan Didier and Davey von Bohlen (formerly of the Promise Ring) inspire copious handclaps and sing-alongs."
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Austinist
"Von Bohlen's voice is still full of childhood wonder and emotion, but with a grey wash of light raspiness, blending astutely with the warm guitar chords and jangly ones. There's definitely traces of The Promise Ring in there, but trust me, it's a different animal. Maritime has successfully extracted all the vitality left from emo and picked up none of the baggage. 'Guns of Navarone,' (after the Gregory Peck film) off the upcoming album, is a charming, twinkly and peppy indie rock tune that pops with an insightful beat, and it's simultaneously both a guilty and proud pleasure. It's something you want to share with friends, but at the same time, it's got to be shameful to listen to something this catchy."
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Chicago Innerview
"Collaborations with post-punk superproducer J. Robbins have proven successful, and this Milwaukee-based trio continues to produce relevant and progressive takes on post-emo melodic pop." - Lizz Kannenberg
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Buzz Grinder
"If these songs are harbingers of things to come, then the album - which hits stores Oct. 16 - will be a great one. If you're cool, you'll hop on the bandwagon, too."
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Side One: Track One
"Hopefully, the band's urgency to consistently keep working isn't a sign of any troubles, especially since I'm completely in love with ['For Science Fiction'].... This reminds me a lot of pop rock from the late 90s. Right as you start to hum along with the catchy songwriting and nod your head to the brisk pace that's set right at the beginning, the song energetically bursts into the chorus and kicks things up a notch. I find that it makes for a fun experience tha, while far from original, is refreshing in its own way since the band is usually a lot more subtle with their sound."
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Baby, You Got A Stew Goin!
"Maritime has made two tracks from Heresy and the Hotel Choir available to the blog world.... Both are excellent, but I'm really, really digging 'For Science Fiction.' The band claims that it will be touring 'well into 2008', which is good, because based on these tunes, I can't wait to see them."
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Pitchfork
7.8 out of 10 "We, the Vehicles is post-emo indie-pop at its finest. Davey von Bohlen, no longer lisping and puling, has developed a confident, nuanced and-- gosh, almost adult?-- singing style that makes you want to drop the diminutive and start calling him 'Dave.' Instead of the rickety, acoustic whatever that often masquerades as emotional authenticity in post-emo songwriter stuff ..., we get sharp, spacious guitar melodies with an actual bite." - Brian Howe
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Magnet
"I rarely use this space to flaunt my advance-listening privileges, but a CD-R of Maritime's second album was slipped to me a good four months before its March release. So there's really nothing else I could do. Davey von Bohlen (singer/guitarist for Maritime and, before that, the Promise Ring) has never had to go fishing for hooks, but We, The Vehicles might be his shiniest lure yet. More guitar-happy than last year's Glass Floor, the album has a certain '80s pep that's pleasantly out of tune with what you already know about that decade's comeback sounds. Talking about the '80s is dangerous here: Maritime's jangle is as much Superchunk as it is Aztec Camera; its occasional synth is actually more Strokes than Human League. And von Bohlen continues to prove he's one of indie rock's smartest pop songwriters, possessing some of the same traits as Ben Gibbard, Lou Barlow and Ted Leo. If you still haven't gotten over your Promise Ring phobia, this is the place to start." - Matthew Fritch
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Alternative Press
5 out of 5 "The album's 11 tracks nicely mix the bouncy rock vibes of the Plan and the Ring with the songwriting smarts that come from doing this sort of thing for a really long time.... It seems like a big balancing act, but Maritime make it look effortless." - Kyle Ryan
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Pitchfork
"Pulling taut the slack of their saggy debut, Maritime's looking on the Mr. Brightside on 'Tearing up the Oxygen'. Davey von Bohlen lisplessly manipulates the full-bodied melody. Eric Axelson's bassline glides like the shadow of fast-moving cloudcover. Guitars quietly erupt into fountains of sparks. A gossamer vocal harmony and precious keyboard line take turns inscribing and transcribing the same inspired hook. Sleep pervades the oxygen: 'clocks keep slippery time,' scenery shifts, and the enamoree's absent eyes 'can be anywhere.' 'You can do anything,' von Bohlen asserts helplessly, 'I should be so lucky,' nailing himself to the heavy air." -Brian Howe
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The Big Takeover
"Maritime's classic 2004 debut, Glass Floor, found the Davey von Bohlen-led quartet presenting themselves as the logical successor to [Davey von Bohlen's] revered Promise Ring, who were unwittingly anointed as the poster kids for the burgeoning emo-pop movement of the late '90s. Glass Floor usurped the reflective, low-profile aesthetic that saturated Promise Ring’s farewell Wood/Water. We, the Vehicles is typically as humble, but ever so much more rhythmic, crisp, and lucid than anything [Davey von Bohlen] has committed to tape so far. Subconsciously or not, Vehicles is all about maintaining buoyancy and tempo. And while such prudent considerations may dissolve into an abyss of ennui for most bands, Maritime are all the more engrossing at it."
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Chicago Reader
"On their second album, the forthcoming We, the Vehicles (Flameshovel), the indie all-stars in Maritime, Davey von Bohlen and Dan Didier from the Promise Ring with Eric Axelson from the Dismemberment Plan—do what they’ve always done best, and do it pretty gosh-darn well. Their streamlined pop songs have a formidable hookiness and economy that betray the handiwork of veterans, and while every song’s worth a listen, a few, like 'German Engineering,' and 'Tearing Up the Oxygen,' hit the highest mark you can hope for from genteel indie songcraft." - J. Miimi
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The Onion
"Full of ingratiating indie pop, Vehicles is its players' most accomplished album yet, and that includes the many years von Bohlen and Didier spent in The Promise Ring."
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Red Alert
"Very rarely does an album come along that produces intelligent lyrics, solid, harmonious sound, and an all-around classically good feel in such a combination that it almost seems too good to be true. Maritime may just be the band to show the music community what sincere, forceful songwriting should song like. Every song on We, the Vehicles is a gem, all complimenting the other. It would be nothing less than a mistake not to add this to any indie rock fan's collection, and could be in contention as one of the best albums of 2006." - Michele Fair
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Magnet
"More than a side project or an 'ex-members of,' it proves beyond a doubt that this is something viable and vital on its own."
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Popmatters
"Songs like 'German Engineering' and album closing 'Proteins and Poison' are beautiful examples of what Maritime does best: crafting spacious, gently persuasive pop songs." - Kevin Jagernauth
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Every Day I Write a Book
"Nerds, like myself, will also notice a lyrical connection between some of von Bohlen's previous works. On Emergency, he warned us that 'We're all arms and dangerous;' On Wood/Water, the album begins by stating 'We're all left hands and accidents;' Finally, early on Vehicles, von Bohlen wraps up this bodily-harm-fueled trilogy by assuring us 'We are powerful, despite our injuries.' And it's that kind of positive charge that makes this disc a must own. If you don’t agree, I’m convinced you’re from Mars."
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Exoduster
"It shouldn't come as any surprise that the eleven-track We, the Vehicles is absolutely brilliant indie pop."
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Colorado Daily
"Strong pop songs with an occasional darkened corner make this one of the catchiest records of a very young year."
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Copyright 2007 Flameshovel Records



Maritime
We, The Vehicles
(DIG034)
Released 04.18.06
Maritime
(DIG042)
Coming 10.16.07
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Copyright © 2004, Flameshovel Records